Kindergarten Books Shop School Zone School Zone (PDF NEW) [Return to the Little Kingdom] ↠ Michael Moritz

Summary Return to the Little Kingdom

A history of early days of Apple Computer originally published in 1984 The time jumping segments between the origin tale and the Macintosh team were an interesting device but I was left wanting for a convergence of these two stories that never happened I ll never get sick of this story though that s the predominant feeling here I just want Fascinating thoroughly enjoyed it Some well nown stories some not so well Aramaic Bowl Spells: Jewish Babylonian Aramaic Bowls Volume One known Found it very inspirational for how not to and how to operate in a electronics product based industry I got this book on my Kindle the evening Steve Jobs passed away and found it to be such a bittersweet read with so much that resonated for me I became an Apple fanboy in the early 80 s and was an early adopter of Macintosh technology starting with the 512 Mac Ten years later an Apple research group discovered the work I was doing with graphics for litigation and hired me to make a commercial aimed at lawyers I moved to silicon valley in 1993 to marry a marketing director for Apple and got a contract representing Apple at the MTV Beach House on Long Island in 1994 Thus Apple has been interwoven in my life in so many ways and I mark a lot of events in my life in terms of highs and lows with Apple I remember as though yesterday the misfire of Sculley s leadership and the almost terminal stewardship of Gil Amelio Of course Steve s return will forever be the stuff of legend and this book only deals with it in 20 some pages added as an afterthought What this book does do so very well is flesh out and recreate the origins of Apple and the extraordinary personalities of Jobs Wozniak and the rest of the pantheon that created the company that has evolved into the magnificent corporation wenow today Moritz paints portraits that do not gloss over the flaws and foibles that were endemic in the early days For anybody who has lived in silicon valley I would give this book a five star rating It s certainly very much worth reading by anyone else but it truly is rooted in the culture and the times of the valley in the 70 s and early 80 s The Magic of the Little Kingdom Steve Jobs and Apple reminds one an awful lot of Walt Disney It is no coincidence then that Steve Jobs went on to become the largest shareholder in Disney through their purchase of Pixar The traits and story inevitably lead both men to Magic and KingdomsThis is the best of the myriad books on Apple and Jobs chronicling the early days of the company Michael Moritz has a distinct view as a reporter and future leader of Seuoia in seeing the business from an early vantage point that is deeply rooted in an entrepreneurial mindsetIf you are looking for a deeper understanding of Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak The LIttle Kingdom offers greater color and perspective than the highly polished personas that we now associated with black turtlenecks and fuzzy bears In the early days Woz was still generous and genius but also his humorous and fun loving wild side show through in recounting the rock parties and Reno trips Steve Jobs was curious adventurous and definitely a rule breaker from his infamous lack of bathing at Atari or his free spirited experimentation in multiple domains As he aged and matured Steve Jobs grew into the refined presenter we Xenophon And His World (Historia Einzelschriften) know in our minds eye His early days were still the youthful rebel that persona was at once loved and hated yet his relentless pursuit of perfection drove the dream to become The Little KingdomIf you want tonow about where it all started than where it ends pick up this read and thank Michael Moritz for the trip Now dated this inaugural corporate. In 1984 The Little Kingdom The Private Story of Apple Computer told the story of Apple's first decade alongside the histories of Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak Now completely revised and expanded Return to the Little Kingdom is the definitive biography of Apple and its founders from the ver.

(PDF NEW) Return to the Little Kingdom ↠ Michael Moritz

History of Apple still sheds light on the world s most valuable company Return to the Little Kingdom is a reprint with the addition of a short prologue and 2010 epilogue of the first comprehensive history of Apple Computer originally published in 1984 as The Little Kingdom If you have read any later books on Steve Jobs or Apple it is highly likely that The Little Kingdom served as source material for the later work It reads as authentic and authoritative Moritz who went on to become a famous venture capitalist had uniue insight into the company since he was granted access by Steve Jobs to serve as a sort of corporate historian during the development of the Macintosh in 1982Of the many books about Apple The Little Kingdom and therefore Return to the Little Kingdom provides perhaps the best coverage of the company s early history 1976 1983 Moritz s prose is heavily infused with uotes from the primary players And one must Geography of the Gaze: Urban and Rural Vision in Early Modern Europe keep in mind that he was writing about Apple s early history when it was current events unlike recent accounts He covers the personal history of Wozniak and Jobs through the founding of Apple and then has the luxury of spending two hundred pages just on the period from 1976 to 1983 This allows for theind of detail that recent books gloss over Further players typically treated as background noise like Mike Scott Mike Markkula and Rod Holt are given their fair due in The Little Kingdom unlike in Woz Jobs centric volumesDon t be fooled by Return to the Little Kingdom s new title and cover promotions This is a 1984 book repackaged with a frankly lackluster prologue epilogue However it s still worth reading as an authoritative source of early Apple history Further because of the author s uniue access contemporaneous writing and narrower focus it tells a better story of the period than any other Apple book Return to The Little Kingdom is a well written book that provides real insight into Apple and its founders This book is a great revisit to the 70s for me Not many people now or even remember that Apple sold memory boards during the days of the Home Brew Club movement in now Silicon Valley first in the Byte Shop of Palo Alto and I was the person who sold them I went to Jobs family garage and picked them up and occasionally experienced Jobs and Woz do their relationship thing at times not a pretty sight when I had orders all part of the emerging small computer world of the 70s I eep to myself my personal opinion of the now famous and infamous Jobs but just now I didn t end up one of the first millionaires out of the deal If you want a great history of Apple and the early days of a computer for everyone very well written by the way you ll like this book The journalistic style comes across with a very detailed description of the early days of Apple some coolinteresting stories but not many lessons per se Nevertheless the first half of the book was very enjoyable Also the revisiting element is uite overlooked I expected about Jobs return to Apple but instead it s of a summary of the latter achievements After reading The Apple Revolution I discovered Return to the Little Kingdom subtitled How Apple and Steve Jobs Changed the World It s not just another book about Apple for 2 reasons it was written in 1984 so when Apple Inc was still Apple Computer Inc and it was written by Michael Moritz then a journalist at Time Magazine but today one of the most famous venture capitalists with investments in Yahoo and Google just to mention two although I must add that he has a rare medical condition which can be managed but is incurable and a res. Y beginning Moritz brings readers inside the childhood homes of Jobs and Wozniak and records how they dropped out of college and founded Apple in 1976 He follows the fortunes of the company through the mid 1980s and in new material tracks the development of Apple to the present and offers.

Ult he stepped back as managing director of Seuoia CapitalIt s not that it adds a lot to the Apple Revolution so no need to read both Now there are very interesting lessons the best for me was probably in the Epilogue In 1984 faced with the challenge of managing a fast growing company in an increasingly competitive business the board of directors were faced with the most important task that confronts any board selecting a person to run the company Only in retrospect have I come to understand the immense risk associated with hiring an outsider It is not an accident that most of the great companies of yesterday and today have during their heydays been run or controlled by the people who gave them life The founder acting with an owner s instincts will have the confidence authority and skills to lead Experience is of little use in a young fast growing company in a new business that has a different pulse and unfamiliar rhythm Experience is the safe choice but often the wrong one Moritz gave also some details about employee shares Here are the things I learnt Both Jobs and Wozniak initially had 8 320 000 shares which they paid 2 65448 so a price per share of 000032 in March 1977 Then Markkula bought the same 8 320 000 shares but for an amount of 91 000 so a price per share of 001094 in November 1977 The three of them were called the Promoters of the company Then shares were sold to employees 1 280 000 to Michael Scott at a price per share of 001 in November 1977 and again 1 920 000 at 009 in August 1978 800 000 to Frederick Holt at 001 in November 1977 and again 960 000 at 009 in August 1978 Same with Gene Carter 160 000 to Gene Carter at 009 in June 1978 and 160 000 to at 009 in January 1979 It should be noticed that employees were ranked as 1 Stephen Wozniak 2 Steven Jobs 3 Mike Markkula 4 Bill Fernandez had no share 5 Frederick Holt 6 Randy Wiggington no info on his shares 7 Mike Scott CEO 8 Chris Espinosa had no share 9 Sherry Livingston first assistant had shares 10 Gary Martin Accounting 11 Don Bruener had no share 12 Dan Kottke had no share 13 John Draper 14 Mike Wagner 15 Donna Whitner 16 Wendell SanderUnknown Gene Carter had 320 000 sharesUnknown Jim Martindale 34 Elmer Baum had no shareJobs was so competitive he did not like to be 2 so he asked to be 0 Buit Scott refused Scott gave himself his number as a reference to 007Wozniak sold some stock to Fayez Sorfim Richard Kramlich and Ann Bowers Noyce s wife In the summer of 1979 Apple sold a total of 7M if existing shares are counted Markkula and Jobs sold about 1M each The Wozplan enabled some people including employees who had no shares so buy some of his I enjoyed the book but I was genuinely disappointed with it The book was originally written in the mid 80 s and an Epilogue added a few years ago The title is almost a total misnomer It is not a biography of Steve Jobs it is mostly about Apple s early life until the sacking of Jobs It deals little or nothing with how it changed the world The epilogue of about 20 pages vaguely tracks the interim without Jobs and the return of Jobs and his impact in a cursory way I was given the book as a gift and I expected that at least 50% would be focussed on the Apple recovery The early years were very well covered but interspersed with nonsensical conversations from a modern era no dates given and their accuracy uestionable They gave a great view on the chaotic start but also of the chaotic style of management particularly that of Jobs There is no clue given as to why he was able to turn things around Overall it s a good book but it leaves too much unsai. An insider's profile of Jobs whose genius made Apple the powerhouse it is today Reuired reading for everyone who's ever listened to music on an iPod Return to the Little Kingdom is timely and thorough and the only book that explains how Steve Jobs founded the company that changed our wor.

Michael Moritz10 on Return to the Little Kingdom